One pharmacist’s opinion: iPhone vs. DROID

I’ve been carrying a Motorola DROID since Verizon made it available back in November 2009. I’ve enjoyed many of its features and consider it a great mobile device. Recently I came into possession of an iPhone. I’ve wanted an iPhone for quite some time, but have been quite outspoken about not switching to AT&T because of poor coverage in our area; Central Valley of California.

Having both devices in my possession has given me the perfect opportunity to test them head-to-head to see which setup I prefer. My original plan was to carry the iPhone exclusively for a month or so to see if I could completely replace my DROID. Unfortunately number forwarding only works with calls. Text messages would continue going to my DROID which would create a problem for me as I receive text messages several fold more than I do direct calls. So I have been carrying both devices for the past few weeks.
Continue reading One pharmacist’s opinion: iPhone vs. DROID

Time to nominate someone for the ASHP PPMI Summit

I briefly touched on the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) last week. As part of the initiative ASHP will be holding a PPMI Summit in Dallas, Texas, November 7-9, 2010 where a lot of brilliant minds will come together to work towards advancing pharmacy practice.
Continue reading Time to nominate someone for the ASHP PPMI Summit

“What’d I miss?” – Week of March 21, 2010

As usual there were a lot of things that happened during the week, and not all of it was pharmacy or technology related. Here’s a quick look at some of the stuff I found interesting.
Continue reading “What’d I miss?” – Week of March 21, 2010

Cool Technology for Pharmacy

While this item isn’t specifically designed for pharmacy, it is one cool piece of hardware; the POS-X PC117. The all-in-one workstation is on the list of hardware I received from Talyst as part of a new system that Kaweah Delta will be beta testing in the coming months. So, I wandered over to the Talyst customer portal where I found some additional information. I’m not positive, but it looks like this is the new workstation that the company will be using on their AutoPharm installations.

The POS-X workstation is a big improvement over the traditional use of a monitor and standard PC tower. It’s not exactly petite, weighing in at 24 pounds, but it’s still a real space saver.
Continue reading Cool Technology for Pharmacy

Pharmacy practice model spotlight in ASHP PPMI eNewsletter

ASHP and the ASHP Research and Education Foundation have partnered to take a long hard look at what pharmacy practice looks like now and what it needs to look like in the future. The venture is called the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative, or PPMI. According to the ASHP PPMI website “there is an urgent need to create a forward thinking hospital and health-system pharmacy practice model.“ I couldn’t agree more.

The current pharmacy practice model is more than 3 decades old and is sorely in need of an overhaul. Of course the changes will represent not only the services pharmacists provide and how pharmacists participate in patient care and safety, but also how to best utilize technology to accomplish the ultimate goal; a better pharmacy practice model.

Continue reading Pharmacy practice model spotlight in ASHP PPMI eNewsletter

Quick Hit – Technology doesn’t replace critical thinking

I’ve had a couple of eye opening conversations over the last week that have me concerned about the thought process surrounding pharmacy technology, where we’re going with it and what it’s supposed to do for us.

Rule #1: “That’s what the computer told me to do” simply isn’t justification for doing something that makes no sense. Computers are dumb. They do what we tell them, albeit very well, but they don’t think independently from the human operating them. It’s ok to question the decision made by technology if it doesn’t make sense clinically or logically. Drug errors occur for many reasons. And as humans we make mistakes and healthcare professionals are not exempt. Technology can be used as an additional barrier between a potential mistake and the patient; however pharmacists and nurses should not decrease their vigilance at any point in the medication distribution and administration process secondary to new technology.

Rule #2: technology implementation should not complicate your process. A complicated process is one that is destined to lead to frustration and create opportunities for mistake. Take advantage of technology to streamline a process. Create a better workflow, not a more cumbersome one.

I think the two things mentioned above are simple common sense, but somehow they get overlooked all the time. Just a thought.

Cool Technology for Pharmacy

The Pharmaceutical Authentication Sensor System, PASS Rx, by Centice is a medication verification system designed to help pharmacists avoid dispensing errors. The system uses a combination of two sensors to create a unique identification profile for oral solid medications. The first sensor utilizes Ramon Spectroscopy to calculate chemical composition while the second sensor, a “machine vision” sensor, takes images of the medication to determine size, color and shape. The information gathered from both sensors is combined to create a unique identification for the drug that can be compared against the Centice database for verification.
Continue reading Cool Technology for Pharmacy

Motion C5 tablet gets a ride

Motion Computing makes several Mobile Clinical Assistants (MCA), including the popular Motion C5 tablet. Don’t be confused by the MCA moniker, a MCA is simply a rugged tablet PC with some additional features like a barcode or RFID scanner and a digital camera. You can get more information on MCAs at the Intel website.

I’ve been fairly critical of this class of device in the past for several reasons. After using the Motion C5 for several weeks last year I found the 10.4 inch screen much too small for everyday use. In addition the design of the placement for the barcode scanner in the handle made the MCA too cumbersome to be really effective in patient care areas; it required too much manipulation to scan patient wrist bands. The nurses I’ve worked with tend to agree.
Continue reading Motion C5 tablet gets a ride

“What’d I miss?” – Week of March 7, 2010

As usual there were a lot of things that happened during the week, and not all of it was pharmacy or technology related. Here’s a quick look at some of the stuff I found interesting.

Continue reading “What’d I miss?” – Week of March 7, 2010