Saturday morning coffee [June 15 2013]: The Purge, Nanopatch, NSA, Adherence, Smartphones, CPOE

So much happens each and every week that it’s hard to keep up sometimes. Here are some of the tabs that are open in my browser this morning along with some random thoughts….

The coffee mug below is from the Netherlands. Just in case you’ve forgotten, I stopped in Amsterdam back in November 2011 on my way to Germany for work. Amsterdam is the largest city in the Netherlands and serves as the regions capital. It’s also a dirty city with a weird vibe to it. Didn’t care for it. I would return to Germany in a heartbeat, but wouldn’t choose to spend any personal time in Amsterdam. I can’t really say much about the rest of the Netherlands.

MUG_Netherlands
Continue reading Saturday morning coffee [June 15 2013]: The Purge, Nanopatch, NSA, Adherence, Smartphones, CPOE

Purdue University develops tablet-based pharmacy tool for catching medication side effects

Tablets are changing the way healthcare professionals practice medicine.

Purdue.edu: “Matthew Murawski, a Purdue University associate professor of pharmacy administration, created a new tool that presents patients with a five-question checklist that catches up to 60 percent of all known medication side effects….”This tool makes the few minutes available for counseling much more rewarding. The checklist results allow the pharmacist to immediately see side effects the patient is experiencing and target their time to solving these problems and improving the patient’s quality of life.” …Murawski’s method, named Pharmaceutical Therapy-Related Quality of Life or PTRQoL, began as paper checklists that took up multiple file folders behind a pharmacist’s desk.”

Purdue University does some cool stuff around the practice of pharmacy. The only thing that makes me cringe is the line “patent pending” (approx. 1:05 into the video). Nothing that is developed utilizing University resources should ever be allowed to be patented. It should all be open source.

Inhaled Corticosteroid Adherence and Emergency Department Utilization Among Medicaid-enrolled Children with Asthma [article]

J Asthma. 2013 Jun 5. [Epub ahead of print], Rust G, Zhang S, Reynolds J.

Abstract
Objectives: Asthma is the most prevalent chronic disease among children enrolled in Medicaid. This study measured real-world adherence and outcomes after an initial prescription for inhaled corticosteroid therapy in a multi-state Medicaid population.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study among Medicaid-enrolled children aged 5-12 with asthma in 14 southern states using 2007 Medicaid Analytic Extract (MAX) file claims data to assess adherence and outcomes over the three months following an initial prescription drug claim for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS-Rx). Adherence was measured by the long-term controller to total asthma drug claims ratio.

Results: Only one-third of children (33.4%) with an initial ICS-Rx achieved a controller to total drug ratio greater than 0.5 over the next 90-days. Children for whom long-term control drugs represented less than half of their total asthma drug claims had a 21% higher risk of emergency department visit (AOR 1.21 [95% CI 1.14, 1.27]), and a 70% higher risk of hospital admission (AOR 1.70 [95% CI 1.45, 1.98]) than those with a controller to total asthma drug ratio greater than 0.5.

Conclusion: Real-world adherence to long-term controller medications is quite low in this racially-diverse, low-income segment of the population, despite Medicaid coverage of medications. Adherence to long-term controller therapy had a measurable impact on real-world outcomes. Medicaid programs are a potential surveillance system for both medication adherence and emergency department utilization.

Posted online on June 5, 2013. (doi:10.3109/02770903.2013.799687)

Two things to consider:
Continue reading Inhaled Corticosteroid Adherence and Emergency Department Utilization Among Medicaid-enrolled Children with Asthma [article]

Cool i.v. room technology – Drugcam Assist

[Update 12/22/2013: I received an email from one of the inventors/developers of Drugcam software informing me of a new website that contains more information about the system. The site is eurekam.fr, which contains pages describing both Drugcam Assist and Drugcam Control. It’s still not a great amount of information, but at least it’s more than I had.]

I’ve talked about technology for the i.v. room extensively on this weblog. It’s no secret that I think the i.v. room is the next frontier for pharmacy technology. The reason I think this is simple, the i.v. room is dangerous, and precious few healthcare systems are using technology to its fullest in that environment.

I’m not the only one that thinks the i.v. room is important. As of December of 2012 I knew of basically four i.v. room workflow management systems: DoseEdg DoseEdge by Baxa, Pharm-Q In The Hood by Envision Telepharmacy, SP Central Telepharmacy System by ScriptPro, and Phocus Rx by Grifols.

Joining the fray are at least two more systems that I saw at the ASHP Summer Meeting just last week: Cato software, which is now owned by DB, and Drugcam Assist by Getinge. Unfortunately you won’t find much about Drugcam Assist online, which is really too bad because it’s an amazing system. The website offers more information and a video demonstration for those that are willing to fill out a form and register. I was not willing.

Drugcam Assist
Continue reading Cool i.v. room technology – Drugcam Assist

Saturday morning coffee [June 7 2013]: Fast & Furious 6, Peach Cobbler, PRISM, Pharmacy, MedPod

So much happens each and every week that it’s hard to keep up sometimes. Here are some of the tabs that are open in my browser this morning along with some random thoughts….

The headline for SMC is a bit different today in case you haven’t noticed. I’ve taken the advice of a Twitter colleague, Charles Webster, MD (@EHRworkflow). Charles has recommended a couple of times now that I make my headline more descriptive. I like the idea so I’m giving it a shot. Feedback welcome.

My trip to Minneapolis, MN for the ASHP Summer Meeting has me waxing nostalgic. The coffee cup below was my trophy for winning the first ever ASHP Midyear Meeting Twitter contest. I’m not even sure what year it was, but I believe it was 2009; don’t hold me to that recollection though. At that time ASHP  was unable to use any of the official Twitter logos due to some time of licensing issues. So instead they generated a Wordle from my website and placed it on the mug you see below. My Twitter handle (@JFahrni) and web address (JerryFahrni.com) are displayed on the back near the handle.

ASHP Twitter contest mug
Continue reading Saturday morning coffee [June 7 2013]: Fast & Furious 6, Peach Cobbler, PRISM, Pharmacy, MedPod

Thoughts on the ASHP Summer Meeting (#ashpsm)

I’ve just returned from the ASHP Summer Meeting in Minneapolis, MN. I was there for work, but managed to squeeze in some sessions; just like a real pharmacist.

For those of you that don’t know, the ASHP Summer Meeting is small, really small. It pales in comparison to the ASHP Midyear Meeting that’s held each year in December. Being small doesn’t make it bad, it just makes it small. The sessions are smaller and less grand, and the exhibitor area is quite a bit smaller than Midyear as well.

Continue reading Thoughts on the ASHP Summer Meeting (#ashpsm)

Every amateur mechanics dream – AR-media 3D tracker app

Check out the video below from AR-Media using augmented reality (AR) and digital technology blended with real world scenarios to create an app to help would-be mechanics work on their cars. What a great, and practical use for AR. Reading instruction manuals for toy assembly at 2:00 AM on Christmas morning just went right out the window; been there.

Now pair that same technology with Google Glass, develop an application that blends AR with medication identification technology and, BOOM, something really cool.

Saturday morning coffee [June 1 2013]

So much happens each and every week that it’s hard to keep up sometimes. Here are some of the tabs that are open in my browser this morning along with some random thoughts….

Is it really June 1st already? Wow, time is flying by this year.

The coffee cup below is a simple, cheesy mug used by some place here in the Denver airport to serve coffee. I’m passing through on my way to the ASHP Summer Meeting in Minneapolis, MN. I get in later this afternoon. The festivities will start for me tonight and go through Tuesday. I plan on spending some time attending sessions as a real pharmacist. I have to admit, I’m a little excited by the idea. I’ve been unable to attend an educational session at a conference in approximately two years. I’m looking forward to having my brain cleansed by some good old fashioned pharmacy information.

MUG_DEN
Continue reading Saturday morning coffee [June 1 2013]