NFC packaging for medications

NFC is good for more than figuring out how much liquor you have.

NFC World: “The two companies [Thinfilm and Jones Packaging] are collaborating to integrate Thinfilm’s NFC OpenSense technology into paperboard pharma packaging and establish key manufacturing processes for production on Jones’ high speed lines.” In addition “the work…will also include the integration of ferrite shield labels with the NFC OpenSense tags. This will enable NFC to function on metalized packaging such as blisters …”

Pretty cool stuff. By using NFC in the packaging, the simple tap of an NFC-enabled phone will allow you to authenticate the product, as well as track individual items. Would be neat to tie this into IV labels somehow.

NFC medication tracking system

Well, well, well, here’s one page in my idea book that I can put a big read “X” through [December 6 2011 – Page #42]. And for all those people that told me it was a stupid idea – you know who you are – I have one word for you: Harvard. Yeah, that’s right, Harvard. It seems that some intelligent, forward thinking people over at Harvard Medical School have developed an NFC system for medication administration at the bedside.

Ah, justification. Feels good. Sorry, sometimes being petty feels good.

NFC World: “Harvard Medical School’s teaching affiliate Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) has developed an NFC system aimed at making it easier for nurses to track and administer each patient’s medication.

The new bedside system uses a combination of Google Nexus 7 NFC devices, which run the new application and store details of each patient and their prescribed medications, and NFC tags attached to patient wristbands, medication packages and employee ID badges.

When administering medication, nurses use the NFC tablet to tap the tags on the patient’s wristband, on the medication and on their ID badge. The application running on the tablet then checks to see if the medication and dosage is the correct one for the patient and records which medication was administered to the patient and by whom.”

Booyah!

Research: Dr. Adam Landman: Near-Field Communication Technology at the Patient Bedside from BWH Public Affairs on Vimeo.

Saturday morning coffee [November 24 2012]

So much happens each and every week that it’s hard to keep up sometimes. Here are some of the tabs that are open in my browser this morning along with some random thoughts….

The coffee mug to the right is from Denver, Colorado. I have been in Denver twice now, once in the summertime and once in the late fall/early winter. It’s a nice place, but not what you’d expect. Well, at least it’s not what I expected. With a nickname like “Mile High” I expected to be going up and down mountainous roads all the time. Not the case. It is much more flat than I expected. The downtown area has a small town feel to it, and the the 16th Street outdoor mall area was very nice. I found a lot of cool things to do down there in the evening. I also found the Mellow Mushroom pizza joint. Dude, that was some seriously good pizza. One thing is for sure, the views were spectacular. I ended up on the 9th floor of one of the hotels I was in. Outside my window was a picturesque view of show capped mountains and green trees. Overall it’s a nice place to visit. Word of caution though about the airport, it’s a mess at times. I’ve only been through there a dozen or so times and have gotten burned on a few occasions. Consider yourself warned.
Continue reading Saturday morning coffee [November 24 2012]

HP ElitePad 900 Windows 8 Tablet. Tah-da!

Engadget: “…the ElitePad has a premium look, marked by a machined aluminum back cover and 400-nit IPS display coated in Gorilla Glass. Also similar to the EliteBooks, it meets the military’s MIL-spec 810G durability requirements, and can withstand three-foot drops, among other accidents. All told, it weighs 1.5 pounds and measures 9.2mm thick. Going by weight, that’s more along the lines of what you’d expect from a larger, 11-inch tablet, but 1.5 pounds is still manageable, especially considering how armored this thing is.

Add to that 10 hours of runtime, a 1,280 x 800 resolution screen, an SSD, and a gaggle of accessories – docking station, “smart jackets” (seriously cool), NFC enabled pen support – and you have one impressive machine. It’s good to see someone going above and beyond and thinking outside the box a little bit.

The ElitePad 900 is scheduled to be released sometime in January of 2012. I can’t wait to see this thing in person.

Nice presentation on NFC development [Slide deck from SlideShare]

Here’s a nice slidedeck on NFC stuff, and it’s recent.

Slides 1-26 are pretty much just an introduction and various tid-bits about NFC. Slide 26 shows some of the NFC enabled phones over the past several years. That particular slide is already out of date though. Almost all new smartphones coming to market today are NFC enabled.

Slides 27-97 contain some pretty extensive informaiton about NFC development, apps, testing, platforms, etc. Good place to start if you’re interested.

NFC & RFID with Android [Slide deck from SlideShare]

I came across this presentation while surfing the SlideShare superhighway of information. It gives a nice little overview of both RFID and NFC technologies, including hardware, software, and potential uses. It also provides information on how to use the Android SDK to build NFC enabled applications. Thinking about giving it a go.