RxADMIX – a semiautomated manual system for compounding sterile preparations

By | November 26, 2014

RxADMIX has been around for a while. I first mentioned it back in September of 2012 (Cool Pharmacy Technology – RxAdmix).

Mark and I initially had RxADMIX pegged for inclusion in our report, In the Clean Room, but after several failed attempts to reach the company for information we removed them from our list. That’s a real shame. I thought the company had gone under, but it it appears that RxADMIX is alive and well. I found the YouTube video below, posted on October 31 2014, a couple weeks ago. It looks like the company is doing a bit of new marketing.

RxADMIX is a different from many of the systems I’ve researched. The overall idea is the same, i.e. use bar code scanning to verify accurate compounding, but the approach is different. RxADMIX is the only system that I’ve reviewed that uses a printed worksheet for compounding preparation.* It doesn’t appear to interface directly with the pharmacy information system, although the system does print patient-specific product labels. It has to get the patient’s demographic information from somewhere. I need more information.

One nice feature of RxADMIX is that the imagers include the company’s NDC Translator Software. I wrote about NDC Translator way back in 2010 (Cool Technology for Pharmacy – NDC Translator). NDC Translator is really cool: “NDC Translator interprets, parses, and converts the data in the barcode to the 11 digit NDC number“.
From the vendor:

RxADMIX provides automated preparation calculations, step-by-step instructions, and label printing aligned with ISMP standards. We offer a library of 300+ standard infusion concentrations and enable customized Compound Preparation Worksheets featuring built in ingredient barcodes.

Essential Product Features:

  • Portable medication selection verification scanning
  • Complete QA documentation of all compounding activity
  • Documentation is searchable by preparation date, expiration date, lot number, ingredient, or NDC number
  • Easy to navigate and centralized location for all compounding material
  • Colored labels, bag, and syringe designs meet all ISMP safety guidelines
  • Build your own RxADMIX from simple to complex (including chemo, NICU, etc)
  • No hidden or per label costs (competitors charge 25¢ per label)
  • Can be used with any model or type of hand-held scanner
  • New versions for use with tablet and hands-free Google Glass are currently in development

RxADMIX® includes essential Safety Features that make compound preparation and labeling simple and safe:

  • Customized Compound Preparation Worksheets contain preparation instructions and barcodes to represent each ingredient
  • Scanning each ingredient barcode against the worksheet provides a double-check
  • The formula template is compliant with state laws requiring template identification for each change in formula
  • Each barcode contains specific information about the preparation: the template number, the compound lot number, and the expiration date.
  • Easy to find and print the compound stock solution label

The patient label is loaded with critical information and has built in safety features:

  • Most current patient information
  • The NDC number assigned to the compounded product
  • Preparation date and expiration date of the compounded product
  • Compound lot number
  • Dose as well as calculated dose volume
  • Expiration date of original stock solution

I’ll look for RxADMIX at ASHP Midyear. Hopefully I’ll be able to collect some new information and see the application in person. I’d love to find someone using RxADMIX in their pharmacy operations and see for myself how it’s being used.

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*When I worked in pediatrics we would always use a compounding worksheet when compounding a sterile preparation. The worksheet was used by the pharmacist to verify all the technician’s work. Of course we were still using the “pull-back method” to verify compounding accuracy. Amazing. I can’t believe that was ever an accepted practice.

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